Biophotons: The Light in Our Cells

There are trillions of cells that make up your body. For the moment I want you to think about just one. That one cell is incredibly busy. In just the last second there were over 100,000 chemical reactions that occurred in this cell. Now, step back and consider your body as a whole. The sheer volume of activity happening inside you at any given moment is almost incomprehensible. With so much information being processed all at once, it’s fair to ask how it all works. The consensus in the scientific community used to focus on a mechanistic approach to explain the inner workings of your body. In this model, molecular reactions were assumed to follow a very linear formula. Essentially event A produces event B which produces event C, etc. In this theory the human body isn’t a fluid, ever-changing system but a static one, governed by a set of rigid rules where the laws of attraction and repulsion of molecular charges run the show. In the 1970s Fritz Popp and a team of researchers at the University of Marburg started doing work with biophotons. Biophotons are considered ultra-weak photo emissions (UPEs). Popp’s work has transformed our understanding of biophotons and the role they play. At one point biophotons were considered byproducts of chemical reactions within our DNA. We now know that the biphotons emitted from our cells are highly coherent energy that may be responsible for the operation of our biological systems.   […]