29 08, 2015

Creating More Surprises and Fewer Mistakes

The past is an interesting concept. By definition the “past” refers to a time that has already happened. However, that isn’t how we experience it in our own lives. We have the ability to relive events over and over again in our minds. This ability to recall and relive is a gift that many of us fail to properly utilize. We tend to focus on the negative aspects of our lives and forget the positive. Think about your day for a moment. What happened? Were you complimented on your work? Maybe a friend drooped by unannounced for lunch? Did you find $20 on the ground? Were you pulled over for speeding? When asked to recall what happened my guess is that most people would emphasize getting stopped by the police. If we removed this one scenario then the rest of the day looks really good, maybe even great. From an evolutionary standpoint, a mistake is a threat to our survival. This makes sense given the right context.   Early humans were at the mercy of their environment and so they needed to be vigilant. At that time a slight misstep could mean the difference between life and death. Our brains are genetically wired to keep us safe and a mistake threatens our security. For most of us this reality no longer exists. Rarely do our mistakes carry with them such dire consequences. Think about it. We make multiple mistakes a day, every day and yet we’re still alive. Despite this regularity we still spend an exorbitant amount of time and energy re-living the past. […]

14 08, 2015

Harnessing Your Energy

Technology has made it easier to communicate with each other. Not too long ago the fastest way to reach someone – outside of a face-to-face conversation – was via letter or telegraph. Responses could take days or even weeks and by then the information may have no longer been relevant. The advent of cell phones, social media, and email has provided us near instantaneous communication whenever or wherever we want – most of the time. If you grew up in the pre-digital era you’re familiar with rabbit ears on television sets. The signal at times provided an erratic, imperfect picture interrupted by periodic bursts of abrasive white noise that sounded like plastic bags being crumpled. This same din could also be heard on the radio. When you hear static on the broadcast it means you’re not tuned into the right frequency. The only way to get rid of it was by either adjusting the antenna or turning the dial. Of course, we still live in a world of static.   Think about the last time you hit a “dead” zone and your cell phone signal started to break up. Better technology hasn’t completely eliminated interference and in some ways may have made it worse. […]